Teaching at CARMAH

At CARMAH, researchers, either as part of their respective professorships, or as a means to engage and inspire students in the area of museum studies and heritage, offer teaching seminars at the Institute of European Ethnology. If you’d like to get more information on teaching at CARMAH, check the flyer on the right side of this page.

In the Winter Semester 2018/2019, CARMAH members will offer courses for Bachelor and Master students.

Course by Sharon Macdonald:

Thinking about Museums

The aim of this Seminar is to think about, with and through museums – including addressing the question that Mary Douglas raised for institutions more generally of how museums ‘think’. We will explore various philosophical questions – epistemological, ontological, metaphysical, ethical, and aesthetic – concerning museums and their activities. These include: What is a museum? What are museums actually collecting and exhibiting? How do museums shape knowledge? Is an object the same object once it is displayed in a museum? Is the provenance of an object essential to its identity? Does it matter if replicas or fakes are exhibited? Should objects from other countries be repatriated? How should museums deal with traumatic pasts and contested histories?

The seminar will be conducted mainly in English, but contributions in German will be welcome.

Courses by Tahani Nadim:

Data troubles: problematising data practices, labour and infrastructures

How to study bots, which make up almost 15 per cent of Twitter users, are responsible for more than 60 per cent of internet traffic and determine political elections? What happens to scientific knowledge making and theory in the age of big data? How (im)material are data labours? This seminar aims to collectively assemble a repertoire of concepts and analytical tools for critically engaging with data practices, data labours and data infrastructures. It’s based on close reading and discussion of selected texts including Geoffrey Bowker and Susan Leigh Star’s Sorting Things Out (2000), Paul Edwards A Vast Machine (2010) and Sareeta Amrute’s Encoding Race, Encoding Class (2016) as well as recent texts on the epistemic, political and methodological challenges of big data, automation and algorithms. These will be juxtaposed with more popular accounts on the issues (e.g. Wired, Public Library of Science, Model View Culture) and relevant art and activist projects on data matters.

Please prepare text excerpts for each session and upload them to Moodle by Tuesday, 9:00am. Each excerpt should contain a brief summary of the text’s key arguments (50%) as well as questions, thoughts, gripes and suggestions for debate (50%). Thanks.

Aus dem Labor: anthropologische Perspektiven auf die Herstellung wissenschaftlicher Erkenntnisse

Wie denken und problematisieren wir die wissenschaftliche Erkenntnisbildung als Gegenstand anthropologischer Untersuchungen? Dieses Seminar baut auf Schlüsselkonzepten und Fragen der Wissenschaftsanthropologie auf und verfolgt deren Entwicklung und Anwendung in den Science & Technology Studies (STS) und verwandten Gebieten. Ziel des Seminars ist es, die theoretischen und methodischen Werkzeuge von STS zu lokalisieren und zu kontextualisieren und so ihre spezifischen Genealogien, Effizienzen und Blindstellen zu verstehen. Konkret wird das Seminar

– einige der Kernideen, Kategorien und Heuristiken von STS (z.B. Assemblage, Inschrift, Grenzobjekt, Naturkultur, Verabschiedung, Symmetrie, Kontroverse) vorstellen.

– diese in Bezug auf konkrete Beispiele und Ethnographien (z.B. Tsing 2005, 2015; Knorr Cetina 1999; Subramaniam 2014; Mol 2003; Haraway 1990; Verran 2001, 2002) diskutieren.

– diese mit analytischen Traditionen in breiteren sozialen und kulturellen Theorien, einschließlich feministischer und postkolonialer Ansätze verbinden;

Das ist ein leseschwerer Kurs. Bitte bereiten Sie für jede Sitzung Textauszüge vor und laden Sie diese bis Dienstag, 9:00 Uhr, ins Moodle hoch. Jeder Auszug sollte eine kurze Zusammenfassung der wichtigsten Argumente des Textes (50%) sowie Fragen, Gedanken und Diskussionsvorschläge (50%) enthalten. Danke.

Aura, Fetish, Mana, etc.: Thinking Objects and Materialities Beyond Representation

The last years have witnessed a renewed concern for tracing changes in and rethinking the relation between humans and objects. Growing out of a critique of the humanist Enlightenment conception of the subject as one centrally defined by language and rationality, affect theory, for instance, has emphasised people’s inherent permeability and openness to be impressed. Related work in the ‘new materialisms’ has pointed to the inherent vitality of matter, while actor-network-theory is generally identified with claims that objects have agency. Across a range of debates, then, there are attempts to capture and make sense of qualities, forces and dynamics that exceed human-centred practices of endowing objects and materialities with symbolic meaning, i.e. to think about objects and materialities beyond representation.

Within anthropology, thinking about the forcefulness of the object world goes back a long way. In fact, concepts such as mana or fetish are central to the early history of the discipline. Together with a range of other terms, including aura and mimesis, totem and animism, taboo and the sacred, these terms have been central to debates that have straddled different fields and disciplines: from anthropology and comparative religion, to arts and aesthetics, psychoanalysis and political economy. The course will focus on the conceptual work these terms have been made to do in the past and in the present. By force, this will make us jump between reading the works of key figures such as Benjamin, Freud and Adorno, early anthropological texts as well as more recent re-interpretations or re-adaptations. The point will be to gain an overview of the different histories and approaches towards thinking the power of objects and materials. By doing so, we will also open up the question of how useful these terms are (a) in thinking about how we relate to the objects and materials around us, whether in museum collections, as consumer items or as the waste and ruins of capitalist landscapes; and (b) for understanding dynamics of attraction, attachment and seduction that are central to contemporary political dynamics.

Neoliberalism and/as biopolitics

When Michel Foucault, over the course of his oeuvre, turned to the issue of ‘biopolitics’, he paused and appeared to have felt the need to make sense of something else first, namely the changing shape of liberal governance in the twentieth century. Following his lead, this course will engage with neoliberalism as biopolitics. Neoliberalism generally refers to a shift from a Fordist-Keynesian regulatory state with extensive social welfare and employment security to a regime of flexible labour and accumulation, free trade and active individualism. It has re-organised the relation between state, individuals and various (religious, kin, civil society, etc.) communities/collectivities. Central to this re-organisation has been the redistribution of responsibilities, both for care and social reproduction, but also for the the burden of social and existential risks. Market logics have penetrated ever more spheres of life, commoditising the most intimate of human relations and the production of identity and personhood itself. Desires, affects and emotions nowadays play an important role in the production of economic value.

 

We will start the course with a conceptual and historical exploration of ‘neoliberalism’ and ‘biopolitics’? What is mean by the two terms, how have they been defined? What have they been made to refer to? We will thereby trace the changing logics and increasingly global workings of capitalism in relation to the histories of the welfare state, colonialism, socialism, the third world debt crisis, etc. through to the present moment. The major focus of the course will be on the 21st century. By engaging with the work of anthropologists as well as scholars from other disciplines, we will explore different themes and spheres that bring to the fore the biopolitical dimensions of neoliberal governance, such as, amongst others: the marketisation of citizenship; the politics of crisis, austerity and debt; the particular way the future has become a field of biopolitical intervention and prevention; the (racialised, gendered, class-contingent) precarity of labour and life; mobility, migration and survival; care work, gender and emotional labour; the neoliberalisaiton of love and sexuality (dating apps!); but also struggles towards maintaining or reclaiming the grounds and infrastructures that sustain communal living and other challenges to the neoliberal-biopolitical order.

Courses by Christoph Bareither:

Medien- und Digitalanthropologie: Einführung für Studierende der Europäischen Ethnologie

Das Seminar führt die Studierenden aus Perspektive der Europäischen Ethnologie in das Forschungsfeld der Medien- und Digitalanthropologie ein. Gefragt wird, wie die Europäische Ethnologie technische Medien als Analysekategorie und Querschnittsperspektive entdeckte und eine spezifische Kompetenz dafür entwickelte, Medien als integralen Bestandteil alltäglicher Praktiken zu begreifen sowie ethnografisch zu analysieren. Wir lernen zugleich, wie die medienanthropologische Perspektive der Europäischen Ethnologie durch Einflüsse aus den Cultural Studies, der Medienwissenschaft, der STS/Infrastrukturforschung und durch praxistheoretische Ansätze bereichert wird. Ausführlich widmen wir uns dann den Besonderheiten der ethnografischen Forschung zu digitalen Medien bzw. Medienpraktiken. Gefragt wird insbesondere, wie wir den Umgang mit dem Internet ethnografisch begreifen, untersuchen und beschreiben können. Abschließend diskutieren wir, wie die medienanthropologische Perspektive eine gesellschaftspolitische Relevanz entfalten und welche Beiträge sie zu öffentlichen Debatten rund um digitale Medien leisten kann.

Wichtiger organisatorischer Hinweis: Das Seminar ist nur für Studierende der Europäischen Ethnologie zugänglich, die bereits das Einführungsmodul (Vorlesung „Einführung in die Europäische Ethnologie“ mit Tutorium und Seminar „Einführung in die empirischen Methoden“) erfolgreich absolviert haben.

Medien der Alltäglichkeit: Theoretische Konzepte und methodische Zugänge der Medien- und Digitalanthropologie (Vorbereitungsseminar zum Studienprojekt "Curating the Digital in Everyday Life")

Organisatorische Voranmerkung: Das Seminar ist als Vorbereitungsseminar für das im SoSe 2019 startendende MA-Studienprojekt “Curating the Digital in Everyday Life” konzipiert. Alle Informationen zum Studienprojekt finden sich auf: https://www.euroethno.hu-berlin.de/de/forschung/labore/media/curating-the-digital-in-everyday-life-ma-studienprojekt

Alle Studierenden, die das Projektseminar belegen möchten, sollten nach Möglichkeit auch das Vorbereitungsseminar besuchen, das außer in Modul 2 und 3 auch als Begleitseminar für das Studienprojekt in Modul 4 anrechenbar ist. Auch Studierende, die das Projektseminar nicht besuchen wollen, sind natürlich  zur Teilnahme eingeladen; das Projekt ist dann nur in Modul 2 und 3 anrechenbar.

Das Vorbereitungsseminar bietet eine Einführung in die konzeptuellen und methodischen Perspektiven der Medien- und Digitalanthropologie innerhalb des Fachbereichs der Europäischen Ethnologie. Diese bieten Zugänge zur ethnografischen Analyse medienbezogener Routinen im Alltag, wobei wir uns auf den Umgang mit digitalen Medien (insbesondere Internet-Medien, Mobile Media) fokussieren.  Zu den behandelten konzeptuellen Perspektiven zählen die auf Medienpraktiken, Medien-Wissen, Medien-Geschichte, mediale Erfahrungen (Erleben, Fühlen, Wahrnehmen durch Medien), digitale Affordanzen, sowie Medien-Infrastrukturierungsprozesse. Anhand kleinerer empirischer Übungen werden diese Konzepte nicht nur theoretisch durchdacht und diskutiert, sondern zugleich ethnografisch erprobt. Dabei gehen wir wiederholt auf die Frage ein, wie spezifische Methoden der Medienethnografie bzw. digitalen Ethnografie (bspw. teilnehmende Beobachtung im Internet, Codierung von Social Media Posts, Affordanz- und Infrastrukturanalyse) dabei helfen, die jeweiligen konzeptuellen Perspektiven konkret empirisch umzusetzen.

Das Seminar bietet die Möglichkeit, eine MAP-Prüfung im jeweils gewählten Modul abzulegen. Für die MAP wählen sich die Studierenden eigenständig ein medienbezogenes Alltagsphänomen und erproben die Umsetzung der theoretischen Konzepte und ethnografischen Zugänge in Form einer schriftlichen Hausarbeit.

 

Past Courses:

In the Summer Semester 2018, three CARMAH members offered courses for Bachelor and Master students.

Course by Christoph Bareither:

Mediating Places of Memory: Medienpraktiken, emotionale Erfahrungen und ästhetisches Vergnügen an Heritage Sites in Berlin

Die Teilnehmer*innen des Projektseminars steigen in ein aktuell am IfEE und am Center for Anthropological Research on Museums and Heritage (CARMAH) laufendes Forschungsprojekt von Christoph Bareither ein, das sich mit Medienpraktiken an Berliner Heritage Sites auseinandersetzt (bspw. das „Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas“, die „Gedenkstätte Berliner Mauer“ oder die „East Side Gallery“). Die zentrale Frageperspektive des Projekts richtet sich darauf, wie die Praktiken der Vergegenwärtigung des Vergangenen an solchen Orten durch die massenhafte Nutzung digitaler Medien transformiert werden und welche Rolle dabei emotionale Erfahrungen bzw. (in Hinblick auf populärkulturelle Nutzungsweisen) ästhetisches Vergnügen spielen. Untersucht werden erstens die Tätigkeiten vor Ort (insbesondere das Anfertigen von Fotos und Videos) mittels teilnehmender Beobachtung und Interviews sowie zweitens die Repräsentation der Orte auf Plattformen wie Instagram und Facebook mittels internetethnografischer Ansätze (wobei sowohl die Bilder und Videos selbst wie auch die Kommentare, Hashtags, Emojis, etc. Teil der Analyse sind). Durch solche ethnografischen Zugänge werden wertende und simplifizierende Zuschreibungen (wie sie bspw. rund um die „Yolocaust“-Debatte über Selfies am „Holocaust Memorial“ auftauchen) aufgebrochen und ihnen differenziertere ethnografische Perspektiven entgegengestellt.

Course by Sharon Macdonald:

‘Too much stuff!’: Towards an anthropology of overload

In the face of hyper-production and consumption, what happens with all the stuff? How does some get kept for the future and what happens with the rest? Are we at risk of ‘stuffocation’ – being submerged in too many things, too much information and too many decisions to make? The last decade has seen a major rise in many countries of specialised products and services to help people cope with excess and overload. This includes vast storage facilities for things that won’t fit into people’s homes, smart domestic storage ‘solutions’ to help pack more and more in, and professional organisers and ‘declutterers’ to help people to ‘let go’ of excess stuff. Hoarding has become defined as an official psychological illness in the US; and in many West European countries even museums have begun looking into whether they can get dispose of things from their increasingly growing collections. Focusing on material profusion – the overload of things ­– in this seminar we will take an anthropological perspective,  considering especially whether what we are witnessing is a  particular kind of relationship of personhood, things and time.  To do so, we will look for theoretical elucidation from various areas, ranging from those concerning the nature of contemporary capitalism to  sustainability, and from purity and danger to spirit possession.  In the first part of the semester we will read and discuss texts. In the second half, seminar participants will present cases of their choice.

Courses by Tahani Nadim:

Counting and re-counting nature

Knowing nature has always entailed numbers: species counts, rates of distribution and extinction, population sizes and trends, land-cover estimates, carbon emissions or, more recently, biodiversity and biocapital measures. Numbers are crucial constituents of our descriptions and our imaginations of nature and, arguably, of all social life. How are numbers used for making nature visible and valuable and what stories can we tell with and about numbers? How do numbers do different kinds of natures and what role do narratives play? The course addresses these questions by examining specific instances of numbers-in-practice as well as through discussions of more general number-related terms such as “percentage”, “rankings” and “population”. In attending to the performativity of numbers in the context of counting and accounting for different natures, the course explores the co-constitutive dynamics of scientific knowledge, representations and the governance of nature. It will provide a range of analytical categories and methods for ethnographically encountering numbers and introduce students to anthropology of numbers. Readings will include Thomas Crumb, Helen Verran, Theodore Porter, Arjun Appadurai, Jane Guyer and Susan Greenhalgh among others.

Das Naturkundemuseum, seine Geister und Monster

Naturkundemuseen sind zentrale Orte der Wissenschaft, ihre Sammlungen und Ordnungen bilden die Grundlagen „moderner“ Wissensproduktion. Auch zählen ihre Objekte und Präparate zum kulturellen Erbe eines Landes und sind somit wichtige Elemente in der Konstruktion von Nation, Kultur und Gemeinschaft. Als „Kontaktzone“ (James Clifford) von Geschichte, Wissenschaft und Gemeinwesen (ver)bergen Naturkundemuseen demnach Spuren komplexer und andauender Aushandlungs- und Übersetzungsprozesse zwischen Natur und Kultur, nationalen und globalen Skalen, Vergangenheit und Zukunft, Biologie und Gesellschaft, Ästhetik und Politik. In diesem Seminar setzen wir uns mit dem Naturkundemuseum als Raum, Institution, ethnografisches Feld und epistemisches Arrangement auseinander und untersuchen durch diese Figurationen zentrale kultur- und sozialtheoretische Begriffe und Heuristiken wie z.B. „ghostly matters“, das Andere, Evolution, „imperial formations“, „Rasse“, Repräsentation, Natur-Kultur, Klassifikation. Im Seminar werden wir folgende Autor*innen lesen: Donna Haraway, Avery Gordon, Ann Stoler, James Clifford, Banu Subramaniam, Edward Said, Thomas Richard u.a.

In the Winter Semester 2017/2018, three CARMAH members offered courses for Bachelor or Master students.

Courses by Christoph Bareither:

Digital Memories: Mediale Erinnerungspraktiken im Alltag

Dass alltägliche Erinnerungspraktiken häufig im Umgang mit Medien realisiert werden, ist keine Neuigkeit: Schrift, Bild, Fotografie, Film – sie alle werden seit langem eingesetzt, um Vergangenheit zu vergegenwärtigen. Zu Beginn des Seminars nähern wir uns dieser Mediengeschichte alltäglichen Erinnerns an, um anschließend nach der Spezifik von Erinnerungspraktiken zu fragen, die auf digitale Medien zurückgreifen. Aus der praxistheoretischen Perspektive, die wir dabei einnehmen werden, lassen digitale Medien multiple technische Affordanzen in die Prozesse alltäglichen Erinnerns einfließen. Dadurch entstehen keine völlig ‚neuen‘ Gewohnheiten, doch es entstehen veränderte Erinnerungspraktiken, die Alltagswirklichkeiten sozial, emotional, ästhetisch und auch politisch mitgestalten. Um diese Transformationen besser zu verstehen, lesen wir Texte aus dem Bereich der Erinnerungsforschung sowie der Media & Digital Anthropology, ergänzt um Perspektiven aus der Populärkultur- und ethnografischen Emotionsforschung. Diese Literatur bildet den Hintergrund für eigene explorative ethnografische Streifzüge (kurze Interviews, teilnehmende Beobachtungen im Internet oder in (Offline-)Erinnerungsräumen) im Rahmen von regelmäßigen Arbeitsaufträgen.

Media & Digital Anthropology: Einführung für Studierende der Europäischen Ethnologie

Das Seminar führt die Studierenden aus Perspektive der Europäischen Ethnologie in das Forschungsfeld der Media & Digital Anthropology ein. Gefragt wird, wie die Europäische Ethnologie technische Medien als Analysekategorie und Querschnittsperspektive entdeckte und eine spezifische Kompetenz dafür entwickelte, Medien als integralen Bestandteil alltäglicher Praktiken zu begreifen sowie ethnografisch zu analysieren. Wir lernen zugleich, wie die medienanthropologische Perspektive der Europäischen Ethnologie durch Einflüsse aus den Cultural Studies, der Medienwissenschaft, der STS/Infrastrukturforschung und durch praxistheoretische Ansätze bereichert wird. Ausführlich widmen wir uns dann den Besonderheiten der ethnografischen Forschung zu digitalen Medien bzw. Medienpraktiken. Gefragt wird insbesondere, wie wir den Umgang mit dem Internet ethnografisch begreifen, untersuchen und beschreiben können. Abschließend diskutieren wir, wie die medienanthropologische Perspektive eine gesellschaftspolitische Relevanz entfalten und welche Beiträge sie zu öffentlichen Debatten rund um digitale Medien leisten kann.

Courses by Tahani Nadim:

Science matters: anthropological perspectives and interventions in the making of scientific knowledge

How do we think and problematise scientific knowledge-making as an object of anthropological enquiry? This seminar builds on key concepts and issues of socio-cultural anthropology and traces their development and application in science & technology studies (STS) and related fields. The aim of the seminar is to situate and contextualise the theoretical and methodological tools and commitments of STS and thus understand their specific genealogies, efficacies and blind-spots. Specifically, the seminar
·       introduces some of STS’s core ideas, categories and devices (e.g. assemblage, inscription, boundary object, natureculture, enactment, symmetry, controversy)
·       discusses them in relation to concrete examples and ethnographies (e.g. Tsing 2005, 2015; Knorr Cetina 1999; Subramaniam 2014; Mol 2003; Haraway 1990; Verran 2001, 2002)
·       connects them to analytical traditions in broader social and cultural theories including feminist, postcolonial, poststructuralist and Marxist approaches

Data troubles: problematising data practices, labour and infrastructures

How to study bots, which make up almost 15 per cent of Twitter users, are responsible for more than 60 per cent of internet traffic and determine political elections? What happens to scientific knowledge making and theory in the age of big data? How (im)material are data labours? This seminar aims to collectively assemble a repertoire of concepts and analytical tools for critically engaging with data practices, date labours and data infrastructures. It’s based on close reading and discussion of selected texts including Geoffrey Bowker and Susan Leigh Star’s Sorting Things Out (2000), Paul Edwards A Vast Machine (2010) and Sareeta Amrute’s Encoding Race, Encoding Class (2016) as well as recent texts on the epistemic, political and methodological challenges of big data, automation and algorithms. These will be juxtaposed with more popular accounts on the issues (e.g. Wired, Public Library of Science, Model View Culture) and relevant art and activist projects on data matters.

Course by Katarzyna Puzon:

Heritage and the City

This seminar deals with an anthropological analysis of heritage and introduces students to important concepts and various approaches of studying heritage in and of the city. This includes close reading of key texts in heritage studies and urban anthropology. Over the 15 weeks we will discuss some central debates in the subject and assess their implications for anthropological theory and practice. How does heritage manifest itself and how is it mobilised in the urban context? How is diverse heritage ‘gathered’ and ‘displayed’ in the city? We will discuss influential theories and contested visions of heritage and address emergent heritage issues by looking at a series of case studies, including ongoing transformations in Berlin and other cities in different parts of the world.